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Historical: 1967 and other time periods.

Introduction

It could be important in making a study of Scientology (organisations) to get some idea of how the Scientology Orgs "roller coastered" – Roller coaster: went up and down in activity and size, the word Roller-coaster taken from fairground shows that took those who paid, up and down quickly.

There are two items here: A description the Pilot wrote about the year 1967, a description (by Leo Swart) of how the Scientology org in Cape Town (South Africa) went up and down over a number of years. I have also added my experience of 1967.


First the pilot:

[SuperScio mailing list; part of a series of repostings of gems of the Pilot, reposted Wed, 18 Jul 2012]

Pilot'sPost Z13
Scn History, the Year 1967

(Tech, prices, beginning of PTSness, RJ67, beginning of fanaticism)
From Post 28 -- April 1998

(Editor's/relayer's comment: In this excerpt from one of the Pilot's fortnightly posts, he answers questions sent in to him via the news group alt clearing technology in the previous fortnight. I have corrected a couple of points, a large amount of it is accurate, and some small points near the end seem a bit doubtful -- would be glad of feedback if you have data/experience. If you send something, I may publish it on the Internet, with your name, unless you specific deny permission to do so. Ant]


Answering Gregg About 1967


On 30 Mar 98, elrond@cgo.wave.ca (Gregg Hagglund) asked on
subject "A WINDOW IN TIME: State of Co$ Beliefs 1967?"

> Okay Ex members and Scholars:
>
> Let us pretend it is 1967 for a moment.

A very good year. I was on staff and training as an auditor.
This was before crush Ethics and crush sell and the Academy
was a pleasant place where you could chat with the supervisor
or the other students about the tech. There was a lot of fun
and a light-hearted atmosphere. Of course I was at an outer
org rather than in the thick of it, and things might already
have gone very bad up at the top.

> Please fill me in (with references if possible) as
> to the state of the Co$ beliefs at this time.
> Was OT3 written yet?

Initially, only trained auditors could do the advanced levels.
The modern Clearing Course had started in 1965, but only
a Class 6 auditor (Saint Hill Special Briefing Course - SHSBC)
could do it. The only way to get grade 6 initially (a pre-requisite
for clear) was to do the SHSBC.

John MacMasters (1st modern clear) finished the CC (clearing course)
in 1966.

Then a solo bridge was created to allow people to do clear without
all the intensive training. It consisted of doing the 1966 style
Dianetics course (a light, easy version of Dianetics, neither
the old heavy DMSMH style nor the professional R3R style that
is used in modern Dianetics). This was so that the amateur
could learn a bit about auditing and how the mind worked.
After this and getting lower grade auditing (about 25 hours usually),
the person could go to Saint Hill and get audited on grades 5 and
5A (power and power plus), and then do the solo course and grade 6,
and then he could do the clearing course. [Ed comments: I remember you only had to be enrolled in an Academy Course to get half price auditing. At least some orgs accepted enrolment, so you did not need to start a course to get half price auditing.]

Prices were not too bad. Grades 0 to 4 auditing were $125 each
or $500 for the 0 to 4 package. The DAC was either $250 or $500
(I forget). Grades 5 and 5A were about $500 each. The Solo+R6
course was, I think, $500 and so was the Clearing Course.
Maybe 3 thousand for the entire lot. The basic price of
auditing in general was $25 per hour (and half price for anyone
trained through class 2 or above).

During 1966, there were only a handful of clears around, and
all of them were exceptionally highly trained auditors and either
on staff or running franchises etc. There were small numbers
of Class 7 auditors around (the highest level [at that time]) who were trained
to run power processing. Power was only delivered to public
at St. Hill [UK], but outer orgs were allowed to run it on their
contracted staff members if they had a class 7 on staff.

In 1967, ordinary public finally started completing the solo
route to clear and coming back as clears. Note that it took
time for them to do the new solo bridge (Dianetics course etc.).

This generated lots of excitement. The expectation was that
these new public clears would be like the highly trained old
timers who had gone clear, but of course there was no way
that fooling around with the CC platens was going to turn
a beginner into the same breed of cat as somebody who had
spent a decade studying the tech and trying to audit and help
people.

I suspect that trying to make these public "clear" look and
act like the old timers (most of whom really were very able)
was the real beginning of the bullshit PR and false claims.

OT 1 and OT 2 had come out. OT 2 was a long run, so staff
members were allowed to take the platens home with them and
solo audit it on themselves while getting back to work at
their org. [Ant/relayer note: When I took OTI in, I think, 1967 it consisted of doing the Clearing Course again – I had run through it three or four times before I dared claim "clear"]

There was no Case Supervision (C/Sing). Eventually, when I
was auditing in the HGC (Hubbard Guidance Center -- where
professional auditing is done), I would write the next
thing to audit in the 'Suggest' section of the session report
and the DofP (Director of Processing) would either initial
it or suggest something else to run, but it was all very
informal.

Solo auditors were trained in what they were going to do
and then given their materials, and then just ran it on
their own without a C/S looking over their shoulders.

The "Only Accounts Talks Money"* policy was still in, so
the registrars were not even allowed to bring the subject
up, and certainly couldn't hound people about paying for
things. Accounts would simply advise the person of the
price of things because they were not trained in any
kind of sales techniques. So the reg would explain
about a course and how great it was and accounts would
say it costs so and so much and that was about the end
of the matter. This made them fairly comfortable to
deal with. It was very much like registering at a
college and not at all like going to a used car dealer. [Ant/relayer remark: I am sorry, I can't keep my relayer hat on here – I think that is so funny "used car dealer" !]

Although high crimes and fair game existed in theory,
there was almost no practical use of these things at
this time. This was before the witch hunts. So these
things were like sleeping time bombs rather than in
heavy use. But that was probably only true in these
outer orgs, where people were interested in studying
the subject rather than in hunting for squirrels and
SPs. But that would change fairly rapidly.

By late 1967, the HCOB "All sickness equals PTS" had
come out. Now this idea of finding SPs and disconnecting
from them became the "why" for things going wrong etc.
Sometime late in 1967, a staff member was put in liability
for the first time (by 1968 it was a common occurrence).
Also somewhere in this time period, one of our staff
going out to St. Hill for advanced levels was declared
suppressive (another first). But by 1968 we all kept
stacks of disconnection forms in our desks for disconnecting
from the weekly list of newly declared suppressives.

It was at the end of 1967 that the RJ67 Tape (Ron's Journal
1967) came out and was played for all staff, and subsequently
for all public. The transcript for this tape is available
from Clambake and other internet sites.

This tape was a real shocker and it is basically when OT 3
was officially released. Throughout the year, Ron had
been completely out of sight, and there were only vague
rumours of the Enchanter (his yacht) and so on. Suddenly
he's on "an island in the sea" (Valencia) and people can
fly off to the secret location and do this super level that
handles the event that made this galactic sector a wasteland.

At this point the fanaticism begins to escalate. There was
just enough that did work in the tech that we were using
(doing things like finding that solutions to old problems
would themselves become new problems) that we had tremendous
confidence in Ron. And the real data about OT 3 was
confidential, so we just had to trust that he was being
as smart about that as about the older stuff which we
could discuss and try out. Note that there was a much more
liberal atmosphere about discussing and experimenting with
tech in those days.

So we swallowed it all, hook, line, and sinker. And public
people would go out and do these OT levels and come back with
no more OT abilities than a Lamppost. [Editor note: Pilot humour, I love it, Ant/inefficient ed]

But we trusted and we believed. And there was just enough
of the sporadic OT phenomena (the critics will say bullshit,
but these things did happen) still around to make it all
seem true. But the sporadic OT phenomena only occurred for
trained auditors and old timers and not for these untrained
OTs who only put on airs of importance.

And a Sea Org member who is not an auditor but has learned
to be afraid of misunderstood words and squirreling the tech
is about the furthest from real OT that one can get. And
they will go after anyone who is thinking and able to do
things and pound them into the dirt until any of these
rare OT manifestations disappear completely.

But I'm slipping over into 1968 and 1969 here. The really
heavy force didn't hit until fall of 68.

> Had Hubbard taught there
> was no God or Christ? If so at what level?

You're thinking of the Class 8 lecture called "Assists" that
is available on various websites.

This was given as part of the first Class 8 course in mid
1968 and it was confidential.

> Were Body Thetans part of the teachings? Etc.

This was confidential material on OT 3.

The earlier tech on "entities" dates back to 1952 and is
mentioned in A History of Man and discussed extensively
in the Hubbard College Lectures (HCL), but was always
considered to be a minor case factor rather than a thing
of great significance. There (the HCL tapes) he mentions
that the most recent "joiner" incident (as things like
the Xenu incident were then called) took place on Earth,
but he says that there are many earlier ones.

Nobody paid much attention to these things in 1967. The
A History of Man book was around but considered to be old
and out of date, so people read it but didn't get all
worked up about it.

> Orgs were held as Franchises were they not?

No.

There were a small number of central orgs, maybe twenty or
thirty all together. They were basically part of CofS and
final management authority was the World Wide (WW) organization
which was also at Saint Hill [UK] (in addition to the SH organization
itself).

The central orgs could deliver training and processing up
through Class 4 and Grade 4 to their public.

The franchises were franchised operations, with the franchise
holder providing the initial financing and taking profits.

A franchise was only allowed to deliver the Dianetic Auditors
Course (the DAC, the public route to solo) and the grades
up to 4, but it could not train classed auditors.

Saint Hill delivered Class 6 (the Briefing course or SHSBC)
and Grade 5/5A, and the solo training and levels (Grade 6,
Clear, OT 1 - 2). [Editor note: Also Class VII (Power) training to Class VIs who had a contract to an Org, Ant]

When OT 3 was released, and when the Class 8 course first
came out, these were done only on the ship with Ron. Then
they were exported to SH (1968).

Sometime in 1968, HAPI was established in Scotland to
provide an alternate location for doing OT levels. [Ed note: incorrect, HAPI was a class IV org, the AO was moved from "the Sea" to another location in Edinburgh. Pubs Org was moved to Edinburgh in '68, close to HAPI and the AO was also there (on a sort of road bridge), Ant]

And then the general ban on Scientology staff (not public
or tourists) emigrating to England was passed there. In
other words, Scientologists could travel there to take
courses, but Scientology employees could not emigrate or
get work permits, so transferring new Sea Org recruits
to England was blocked.
[editorial note: I know nothing of that. However a British Government Minister issued an order (found illegal a year or so later) banning anyone coming to England to study Scientology, which was the cause of Hubbard ordering Pubs Org to be out of UK with all its books within 24 hours, Ant]

A "flight to freedom" had been organized in the US at this
time (mid-1968). It was a chartered jet full of hundreds
of people going out either for their OT levels or to join
the Sea Org. When it landed in England, it was stopped
at customs and the new ban was enforced for the first
time, denying all the new sea org recruits their entry visas.
They apparently had gotten a list of who was a recruit
vs who was paying public and denied entry on this basis.

There was a mad scampering of waking various staff members
up at Saint Hill that night, and a crowd of trained sea
org people replaced some of the public (who went to
St. Hill) on the plane and the flight was re-chartered
for Los Angeles, where it landed and they setup the Los Angeles
advanced org (AOLA) and ASHO (American Saint Hill organization)
on the spot.

But I digress. So back to 1967. The franchises were
fairly loose and autonomous. Then comes the heavy ethics
and worries about squirrelling, and the various mutinies
and leaking of OT levels in 1968 and 1969, and franchises
like Bernie Green's breaking loose and delivering OT levels
without authorization. So the court battles and fair
game go into full force.

> What level of Scn'tist was permitted to be a
> Franchise or Missionholder?

I'm not sure of the specific requirements. After the Class 8
course came out, they had to have a class 8 to ensure that
standard tech was delivered (late 1968), but the franchise
holder himself did not have to be a class 8 (some were), but
only had to employ one.

The class 7 course was limited to contracted staff, so
the highest training a franchise would have prior to late 68
would be to have one or more class 6 auditors (SHSBC granduates).

I think that by the 1968 time frame, the ethics record and
loyalty of a potential franchise holder was of more interest
than their training level as far as getting approval to open
up for business. Later there were big price tags on starting
a new franchise, but I don't think that this was the case at
this time.

---

Throughout this time period, there were things happening at the
top that only hit the orgs on a delayed basis and which in turn
hit the franchises even later.

Following policy or adhering to standard tech was not done
with the later fanaticism. The very term "standard tech" did
not come out until the first class 8 course in mid-68. And
there is a policy which says that policy is a guiding thing
rather than an absolute, so it was usually used to settle
disputes between arguing staff members rather than enforced
as law.

So a policy or bulletin might be issued, and an org might be
careful and tentative about trying it out to see what happened
before going hog wild on it. There was still room for good
sense and judgement. And sometimes old timers would still
try to write things up and correct mistakes and pass these
up the line to World Wide. But it seemed like nobody there
was listening any more.

The heavy handed attitude and literal minded interpretations
must have started at the top in the 1967 time frame, but
it only worked its way down to the outer orgs and franchises
slowly.

Gradually the Sea Org was hitting the orgs with more and more
force. And the "standard tech" release in 68 caused auditors
to be trained by force. And Ethics kept getting tougher,
and things kept getting worse, until there was a complete
collapse in 1969.

Then there was a major turn around in 1970. Many of the
LRH Eds from that time have disappeared (they are no longer
by LRH or something like that) and most of the crap came
back in within a year or two, but it shows that a reform
is possible if their backs are to the wall.

The 1970 "reform" included things like cancelling all penalties
for lower conditions. The fair game cancellation, which was
in name only in policy was re-interpreted to mean not engaging
in the action of fair gaming (obviously that interpretation
only lasted for about a year). Most declarations of SPs were
considered to be incorrect and an effort was made to recover
people who had been wrongly declared (thousands came back in).
Disconnection from SPs was pretty much abandoned briefly.
Sea Org missions announced things like the SO was in liability
to the orgs for having ruined them and was making amends.

Expanded grades came out and grades were run on clears
instead of insisting that what was wrong with a clear was
due to OT 3. The "overboarding" was stopped, and the C/Ses
became helpful instead of invalidating.

The whole atmosphere changed briefly, at least in the outer
orgs, and then all the vile stuff began sneaking back in.

Basic problems like the confidentiality and the Xenu
business were not handled at this time. So they did
the right thing at lower levels, but the top was still
under this pall of idiocy. I think that is why the
reform couldn't work in the long run. The sickness
began filtering down from the top again and the bad
behaviour gradually came back.

Sorry for getting so carried away here.

Best,

The Pilot

Footnote:
*HCO POLICY LETTER OF 15 MARCH 1965 Issue II, ONLY ACCOUNTS TALKS MONEY



And now what Leo Swart, posted to an internet list on  Fri, 27 Jul 2012


**                                   ivy-subscribers-1
Started January 1997
Relaying positive communication to participants.
**
Oh OK guys - I'm slowly figuring out how this list works! All of your posts were lurking in my spam folder hiding away from me. Have found you now. Thanks for the welcomes received. Including Kim's.  You ask about the boom times in Cape Town. That was a few lifetimes ago it seems now.  In fact there have been several times of boom and bust. I'll give you a brief history of it.

First boom period was back in the 1960's. I wasn't in yet but I heard about it. Alison Parkhouse was running the show. The Org occupied Seafare House in Orange street - is it still there?  Well her PE lectures - she'd FILL the Labia theatre, which is right next door. Fill it.  And guys would sign up and do comm courses etc.  Then heavy insane ethics came in and the field was slaughtered. Alison left and the Org shrunk down to very little. Then there was a government inquiry into Scio in about '68 or 69 and the papers every day were filled with crap and lies and the org shrank to nothing at all. Moved out of Seafare house into a tiny run down dwelling in Darters road not far from there, just off Kloof street.  That's where I joined at the end of '69.

In 1971 - after FEBC and whatever Alison got back in and started building the place up again, we moved to Garmor House in Plain street, then she moved over to the GO and Vivian Eriksen (class 9 auditor) took over and the place got bigger and bigger. I was Dof P from 1973 onwards. We had usually about 5 or 6 full time auditors and churning out 120 to 150 hours of paid auditing a week was easy-sticks. Then Viv blew - after being stuffed around by FOLO too much. I briefly (and rather desultorily) held the ED post for a year and then Jacki Edwards took over and moved the scene into a high roar again. I think we were up to about 20 staff at one time with a heavy concentration in Tech. I was one of the auditors by then. Students and PCs coming out of our ears. Then - naturally - FOLO started buggering her about and eventually she got the boot. They wanted to put me into the job again but I said no ways so we had a succession of EDs, none of whom could take the heat from FOLO. They all crumbled and died.  And they booted out other tech staff as well - Terry McClurg was one of the better ones - and some others just left.  In the end I was the only one left. I was a sort of senior graduate class 4 plus all the C/S courses and internships etc, plus XDn and HRD and all the whatever extras that we had then.

And then I got the boot too. So I said bye bye. They sent a mission down there to try and recover me - Des Kouri his name was, a really decent guy - but I knew it was time for me to leave. We were being lied to and bullshitted and robbed by FOLO all the time and I'd had enough. If they think they can do better then so be it.  So I went Freezone, called the independent movement at the time. And continued from there.

So that's the story more or less. Felt sad for all the friends left behind. Many left the field then too and supported us. We ran the bridge all the way up to NOTs through until about 1994. I got married and moved back to CT for a while before coming here to NZ. Jacki Edwards moved to the UK and the AAC we ran closed down.  We did huge amounts of auditing in the 10 years of the AAC but - to our regret - could get no one to knuckle down and train to be an auditor. It takes a certain mindset to do that - I think you need to be a really hard-arsed old codger to become an auditor. We had too few of those. So we knew that the AAC was not a sustainable system and in the end we packed it all up and went for new pastures.

cheers

Leo


Ant's note on 1967 (written July 2012 – with the suspicion that the mice have been eating away at my memory :-) )


In 1967 I was on Saint Hill [UK] staff. I was commEved off of a Director of Personnel post because I did not get enough staff to fill the vacancies for a rapidly expanding org. I was put alone into Mimeo which was quite a mess (about 3,000 stencils not filed in an orderly manner after being used). The Saint Hill Org was expanding fast and I got help, first an Indian, Saed Mirza, and then more including Rosemary Delderfield. And then the sort of shock. The Ship, wanted loads and loads of Policy Letters made up into packs, for what later was called the Flag Executive Briefing Course. We must drop everything, and work as hard as we could, to get this done as fast as possible. We got special "privileges" which really amounted to our being releaved of all connection to the org, in return for working much harder than usual. We just worked. I do remember one thing. We got all the latest issues, just as every staff member did (there was a separate LRH mimeo which cared for new issues). And I got an issue with a title of Awards and Penalties (or perhaps just Penalties for Lower Condition). It was printed green on white, in the standard format of Policy letters. But I had a job believing it. It said that if one was in a low condition (perhaps Liability) one should not leave the premises, not have a bath, wear old clothes. I can remember being out in the grounds with this Policy Letter, in sunshine I think, and wondering whether this could be a practical joke Ron was playing on us, and thinking that surely Ron would not use his comm lines that way.

I understand that while we in mimeo were introverted into getting these Policy Letter Packs produced, the rest of the Org was plagued with Missions and missionaires from the ship but we heard nothing of that. And on the 1st. January 1968, chaos was created by (on Ron's orders) David Ziff took key people (self included) out of the World Wide and Saint Hill Orgs, to form what was at first called Publications Division, World Wide, later to become an independent Org.